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To become a superstar at work, you need to extend your knowledge of the job to knowledge of the organization.
If you run into a string of these pesky nightmares, or even one whopper, it’s probably time to take stock of your situation and acknowledge your stress is worth addressing.
Boat rockers, contrarians, call them whatever you like—sometimes these people become office stars because their courage naturally attracts followers and admirers. But how do you assert yourself and effect change without being a mere irritant?
One of Lisa Olsen’s favorite topics to discuss with assistants is the art and science of personal mastery. At the core of personal mastery is self-awareness.
It can happen to any of us, says author Holly Caplan, so if it does, have these tips already in mind.
You feel you’ve almost got minute-taking down, but there’s still that tiny flutter of apprehension going into a meeting. See if our Q&A soothes your mind.
I know assistants already add value every day. And yet in today’s accelerated world, everyone needs to up their game. Thinking of yourself as an ambassador can set you apart and contribute tremendously to your organization’s success.
These days many young people see no need to wait their turn before moving up the ladder of success – and their refusal to patiently stand in line is the right idea, says Michelle A. Turman, author of Jumping the Queue: Achieving Great Things Before You’re Ready.
Whether they’re a screamer, a blamer, a nit-picking perfectionist, an over- or under-delegator, or just a plain old bully, bad bosses are as common as the jobs they supervise. Here’s how to stay sane and get ahead.
When you leave a job with an organization, your responsibility to that company doesn’t completely end on your last day, says Cheryl Hyatt of Hyatt-Fennell, an executive search firm.
It can be hard to sacrifice things you usually spend money on, but it can also be fun to cut back and watch the savings accumulate. Here are eight ways to save.
Being successful in an interview means standing out. That’s the real task. Fielding and satisfying interview questions and then posing a few of your own is the minimum requirement, but it’s not enough to make you stand out. You’re not entirely ready for your interview until you can check these next four boxes as well.
Do you ever find yourself explaining why you are late day after day to work, or anything else? You know that you need to make a change but all attempts you have previously made have been met with failure. So how do you stop this cycle of neverending tardiness?