Featured Article

Pay attention to small amounts of spending that could add up to huge savings across your organization.
If you don’t win the promotion or new job you interviewed for, find out how to strengthen your position for the next opening. After every interview, immediately critique your own performance by asking yourself these questions.
Rachel Montgomery of Ft. Meade, Md., came close to burnout, working long hours and weekends, before she found the power to make a priority of what she has to do, should do and even wants to do. Here are her tips.
To survive in your workstation, you may have unconsciously adapted to many small inconveniences. Take a few minutes to analyze your surroundings, and you’ll see how small changes could add up to a major improvement to your work space … and your mood.
Here’s a quick gift of tips to get back seconds, minutes, even hours. After all, we’re entering the season that’s more demanding on our time than we ever thought possible!
Derail distractions for even an hour and you’ll learn a new skill, or chug through an assignment, much faster. Here’s how.
Your reputation remains your best argument for persuading the boss to alter your work schedule or sometimes allow you to work from home.
Are you one of those people who tend to put others’ needs ahead of your own? If so, that often means you’ll take on more and more work, committing to responsibilities with no time to complete them, until your life spins out of balance. Instead, try these 3 steps …

Don’t step blindly into a promotion

November 1, 2004 Categorized in: Featured Article

Your boss confides that, because you excel at your job, you’re being recommended to become the assistant for his or her boss or another VIP in the organization. While a promotion sounds like great news, it is important to …
Neglecting to periodically purge files and reorder your data can severely limit your hard drive’s life span and slow down your computer. Here are two ways to clear the digital cobwebs and restore order.
It may not appear in your job description, but making the boss look good—and even protecting him or her from the slings and arrows of everyday business—has to rank up there with your most important “unspoken” duties, right? (Otherwise, what happens to you when the boss goes down in flames?)
Even a “quiet” workplace often produces noise at 40 decibels, and office machinery can reach 80 decibels. Minimize distractions by strategically placing the noisemakers (and people) when you arrange work spaces. Here’s how…
Organizing your boss isn’t impossible; just don’t expect to arrange the work space as you would for yourself, says professional organizer Dorothy Breininger. Here are 4 tips to make it happen.