Communication

There’s a clear generational divide over whether it’s appropriate to use emojis in work communication.

Create a practical FAQ list

January 27, 2021 Categorized in: Writing/Editing

Lists of Frequently Asked Questions help employees and customers master almost any information or procedure. These tips will help you create a useful list.

Words, Words, Words: February ’21

January 27, 2021 Categorized in: SpeakingWriting/Editing

Write it right, say it right, spell it right.
In my job I often have to write some unpleasant correspondence to people and firms that have let us down or not given us what they promised. Do you have any tips for writing a complaint letter so it gets acted on, without resorting to becoming a bully?

Words, Words, Words: January ’21

December 23, 2020 Categorized in: SpeakingWriting/Editing

Write it right, say it right, spell it right.

Craft better emails

November 25, 2020 Categorized in: Writing/Editing

Like any communication tool, email takes some skills and practice in order to be effective. Pay attention to these areas.

Words, Words, Words: December ’20

November 25, 2020 Categorized in: SpeakingWriting/Editing

Write it right, say it right, spell it right.
Question: Our company is doing a lot more staff surveys these days. Any tips on how to do them well?

Don’t be a bobblehead

October 29, 2020 Categorized in: Nonverbal Communication

Gestures are a powerful part of active listening. Like many powerful things, however, they have both good and bad effects.

Make sure your questions are questions

September 23, 2020 Categorized in: Speaking

Watch your body language, and keep your ears open for the nuances of tone that create statements in disguise.

Good reasons to pause before answering

September 23, 2020 Categorized in: Speaking

Whether giving a speech, addressing a meeting, or just talking one-on- one with an employee, take a pause before answering tough questions. Here’s why.
Question: “I’ve been asked to write a thank-you note to one of our clients who put the company through hell recently. How do we grit our teeth and write a pleasant paragraph that won’t seem disingenuous?”
Question: “I haven’t shared my mental illness diagnosis with my co-workers or my boss. But there are things my co-workers do that can trigger great, almost suffocating anxiety in me. Do you know of a good way I can let them know of the effect they’re having without making my mental health an open book?”