Internal Communication

“Are they funny?”

September 7, 2022 Categorized in: Internal Communication

We recently heard of one of the boldest new-hire onboarding documents ever.
When it comes to small talk, some people get it and some people don’t—or do they? Here are the five stages of conversational intelligence.
Question: Our company is doing a lot more staff surveys these days. Any tips on how to do them well?
Question: “I haven’t shared my mental illness diagnosis with my co-workers or my boss. But there are things my co-workers do that can trigger great, almost suffocating anxiety in me. Do you know of a good way I can let them know of the effect they’re having without making my mental health an open book?”
Alerts on libraries … Approvals … Automating log updates
The positive impact of a good holiday party keeps on working long after the last dance.

4 ways to praise peers

November 29, 2018 Categorized in: Internal Communication

Recognizing your co-workers’ strengths and work ethic is a great way to build a stronger relationship. Besides, it’s a kind thing to do. If you avoid praising your peers because you don’t know what to say, turn to this list of compliments they will appreciate.
If you sometimes suffer from communication breakdowns, here is a quick true/false quiz that can help pinpoint the cause.
The wheels of business stop for no one, and when an employee goes out on leave—FMLA or otherwise—it’s surprising how quickly the inconveniences mount. The urge to pick up the phone or dash off a quick email to ask a simple question just to keep the wheels moving is powerful, but pause for a moment before you do it and ask:
Question: “My co-workers constantly ask me to assist them with simple problems. Whenever they en­­counter any minor difficulty, they dump it on me. This makes it hard to finish my own work. My boss has been no help. When he talked to these people about handling their own problems, they told him that coming to me was faster. He immediately gave in and said we should just work it out amongst ourselves. How can I end these interruptions?” — Totally Worn Out
A new email extension called Crystal can help bring more empathy to your email conversations. The most important thing is adapting to other people’s written language, says Crystal founder Drew D’agostino.
Stop yourself before saying any of these words, which can make you sound noncommittal, undependable or untrustworthy: 1. “Try.” 2. “I’ll get back to you.” 3. “We’ll see.” 4. “I guess … ” 5. “If.”
Communication bottlenecks can bring your team’s progress to a screeching halt. Make sure that you aren’t responsible for slowing things down because of poor communication habits. Follow these tips.