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Forget elbows on the lunch table and yoga pants in the cubicle. A study has found that technology may be a leading cause of rudeness in the office.
If you are looking for happiness, you are looking for harmony. The Healthy Eating Guide’s Scott Christ offers some ways to make your­­self happier.
In business, trust can make you a better worker, a better manager and more valuable to your customers. Here are tips to help you build trust.
A variety of recent studies have ex­­plored the connections be­­tween people’s motivation during workouts and the music they listen to as they exercise. What they’ve found is that music does make a difference.
When it comes to small talk, some people get it and some people don’t—or do they? Here are the five stages of conversational intelligence.
Poorly written notes from a meeting may result in confusion over who is supposed to do what moving forward. To keep assignments clear and concise, follow these tips.
If your employer entrusts you with one of its social media accounts, you want to be sure not to make a major mistake. Amanda Clark has some advice to help you avoid faux pas.
Bonnie Low-Kramen, author of Be the Ultimate Assistant, explains six things that make assistants good at their jobs and irreplaceable to their employers.
Many misused words and phrases have be­­come so common they’re now in­­cluded in some dictionaries, but they once had correct usages. Here’s a list of phrases you might be saying wrong.
When you think of planning an event, does your stress level rise? Event planning can be difficult, but there are ways to make it less so.
Does your seated posture project confidence or fear; interest or apathy; sloppiness or professionalism? Etiquette expert Barbara Pachter of­­fers some tips to ensure your seated posture is sending the right message.
Your image can be affected by anything—such as whom you spend most of your time with and how you decorate your office. Watch out for these unintended—and unwanted—signals.
Networking comes naturally for some, but not so much for others, writes Equitable Payments co-founder Darrah Brustein. Her tips: