Time Management

Pay attention to first impressions—the ones you’re making on others … Steel your resolve by clenching a muscle … Increase productivity by keeping one to-do list … Optimists find jobs more easily than their peers and are more likely to be promoted …
Next time you feel overwhelmed and frozen, tighten your focus on a few, easy things. Knock out easy tasks for 15 minutes. Then turn your attention to one of the hardest tasks on your plate, and work uninterrupted on that task for 35 minutes. Take a 10-minute break, then start the cycle again.
When resolving to reach a goal, it might help to commit to a hard deadline, and then tell colleagues, friends or a spouse about it. A public commitment might strengthen your resolve.

Web-based productivity tools

October 18, 2010 Categorized in: InternetOrganizingTime Management

Everyone has a preferred method of organizing to-dos and notes. Your computer monitor may be littered with Post-its, or you may use your e-mail software to track action items. Increasingly, though, people are turning to web-based tools. The benefit? To access these “cloud-based” tools, you don’t need to be on a particular computer, network or browser. A few suggestions:

Get twice as much done in half the time

October 11, 2010 Categorized in: Time Management

You want to make every hour count, so you plan your day in 15-minute chunks and prioritize your tasks. That’s smart time management, but it doesn’t guarantee you’ll work productively. You’ll operate most efficiently if you banish aimless anxieties and the urge to procrastinate. Here’s a road map to boost your productivity:
Tap the knowledge of people in your network with Aardvark … Block yourself from frittering away hours online by trying out these two applications … Boost your energy by tackling an item on your to-do list … Cut out that trip to the post office … Never shy away from negotiating …

Reclaim your calendar … and your life

September 21, 2010 Categorized in: Time Management

Stever Robbins, who dispenses advice on maximizing your creativity and whipping your e-mail into submission, now is integrating time management and innovation into a coherent system for getting things done. Here are tips from his new guide to working less and accomplishing more:

Stretched between 2 bosses

September 10, 2010 Categorized in: Managing the BossTime Management

Anyone who has worked for two or more bosses can tell you: The division of labor often leaves you feeling stretched both ways. But with some schedule-wrangling and communication skills, you can manage the work more smoothly.
Strip formatting from a Word document … Work toward a big health goal one text at a time … Make clutter disappear by turning each piece of paper into an action item in your planner … Avoid information overload—and save time—by asking a specific, “micro” question … Connect with people who want your cast-offs …
Question: “I can’t seem to find the happy medium between too much work and not enough. Although I’ve been doing training for 20 years, I still spend a million hours on my lesson plans and class materials … I’d like to nurture my creative side by trying out some new hobbies and activities. How can I stop devoting so much time to my work?” — Too Dedicated
Time is finite. All the more reason to give special attention to managing time blocks on your schedule and the boss’s schedule. Here are two tactics, taken from two executives who use time management to boost their productivity:
With dreaded tasks hanging over your head, you’ll feel more drained and uneasy than if you just tackle them, says author Gretchen Rubin. Next time you don’t feel like making that phone call or going to the gym, try these strategies:
Save up to $250 by shipping your luggage via a carrier rather than checking it at the airport … Focus on the most important 10% of words you speak or write, to make them more memorable … Track your company’s competition with WatchThatPage.com, a free tool that monitors specific web pages.