Problem Solving

Use PAS approach to implement change

April 23, 2012 Categorized in: Problem Solving

Get someone to agree to a change by using the PAS formula, says Fred Kniggendorf of Gravyloaf. “PAS” stands for state the Problem, Analyze the problem, then finish by offering a Solution to the problem.
In honor of this year’s Administrative Professionals Week, April 23-27, we’re taking stock of the changes in admins’ responsibilities over the past decade, based on the IAAP’s Administrative Professional Skills 2011 Benchmarking Survey:
Administrative professionals and executive assistants often see themselves in their support roles as being “nonleaders.” Nothing, however, could be further from the truth, according to a new book, Who Took My Pen . . . Again?

Need relief from carpal tunnel?

February 9, 2012 Categorized in: Problem Solving

On the Admin Pro Forum, the conversation recently turned to carpal tunnel syndrome. “What,” asked a reader, “really works to relieve carpal tunnel syndrome?” Suggestions from fellow admins:

Crafty ways to corner challenging work

January 25, 2012 Categorized in: Problem Solving

Colleagues may hesitate to share work if they’re not confident in your abilities. Here are some crafty ways to show ­others that you’re more than capable:

Career mistake #4

November 30, 2011 Categorized in: AdvancementProblem Solving

Executive search firm CEO Skip Freeman calls it “Fatal Career Mis­­take #4”—not branding yourself as a person who can save or make money for a company. These days, you won’t be hired merely because you have the know-how, he says. You’ve got to be a problem-solver.
Have you ever caused a problem for your computer because you simply didn’t know better? “You’d be surprised how many people unknowingly damage their computers,” says Derek Meister, a Best Buy technician. Here are six no-no’s to avoid to keep your computer out of the repair shop:

Train colleagues to be self-sufficient

November 11, 2011 Categorized in: Problem Solving

Administrative assistant Linda Bates was on her way to a ski vacation when she got a frantic phone call: “The copy machine is jammed! What should I do?” Bates says the path to creating a self-sufficient staff begins with teaching them how to use equipment as it comes into the office.

Look for what you can’t see

November 7, 2011 Categorized in: Problem Solving

During World War II, the British Air Ministry tried to figure out why they’d had so many bomber losses. Engineers looked at every bullet hole on every bomber and decided to add armor plating to the areas with the most holes. It didn’t work. Enter Abraham Wald, a mathematician.
From time to time, people who report to you will bring you problems created by a decision that you made. They may appear exasperated by the pickle you put them in. Your response, in all cases, should be a good-natured invitation for the two of you to go have a look. Use these exact words: “Let’s go see!”
What are you afraid of? Speaking your ideas? Having a difficult conversation? Those cruel dressing-room mirrors during swimsuit season? Well, don’t let the fear of crowds or mirrors stop you. Pushing through the fear is a necessary rite of passage.
You’re a model of efficiency … except when it comes to that one task you dread. Whether it’s filing, completing an assignment for your “difficult” manager or approaching the boss about a raise, you fall prey to the procrastination monster. You know the answer is “Just do it,” so push yourself along with these tactics:
If an underlying tension exists between you and a co-worker, now’s the time to address it. While it may be easier to ignore it, such tensions can mushroom. Use these techniques to reverse the momentum of mounting conflict: