Problem Solving

Protect yourself from data brokers

August 19, 2014 Categorized in: Problem Solving

Some people are pushing back when it comes to how their online data is being used, says CIO social media reporter Matt Kapko.
The first few minutes after you arrive at work are critical to organizing your workday. Follow these three steps to coordinate—and simplify—your day’s work.
Learn how to budget your cognitive resources with these tips from Harvard economics professor Sendhil Mullainathan.
When a problem doesn’t respond to solutions that have worked for you before, unlock your creativity with these approaches.
Which of these activities—ones that we’re all guilty of—fritter away your precious minutes?
How many times are you asked to make improvements to administrative processes without any real guidance on what to do or where to start? The DMAIC process makes you work through specific activities in a defined structure so that any changes you make to a process will be successful.
Most people can delete about three-fourths of their incoming email without even reading it … and not just spam. Messages from your employer, your colleagues and your buddies are wasting your time, argues Bill Jensen, author of The Simplicity Survival Handbook: 32 Ways to Do Less and Accomplish More.
An effective assistant/manager relationship is one in which both people know the difference between a crisis and a routine setback. Do you? Does your boss?
You can help your organization’s brainstorming sessions soar to new creative heights simply by posting these “Rules of Engagement” for the group to follow.
Keep these common items nearby to fight daily battles with job stress.
It’s easy to get fired up about a change that you initiate and control, but what do you do when the change is thrust upon you? Here’s the advice of organizational psychologist Joseph Michelli.
There are basically two types of people in the workplace—those motivated to do well by prevention and those motivated by promotion, writes Heidi Grant Halvorson, associate director of Columbia Uni­­ver­­sity’s Motivation Science Center. Research shows these two types of people need different strategies to succeed.
It’s easy to get emotional when a bank makes a mistake and money is at stake, but experts interviewed by personal finance reporter Daniel Bortz say you’re more likely to get your way if you take a measured approach to addressing the issue.