Organizing

Size matters when it comes to planning events. For smaller events, you can go solo. But for larger ones, it takes a committee, a nod from management and a zinger of a spreadsheet for keeping tasks and timelines on track. To help you track the details, try this sample checklist below adapted from Midwest Meetings:
Make Adobe Reader remember where you left off, as well as your selected zoom and pan settings … Improve daily planning by being specific on your to-do list … Expect a VIP visitor at the office? Use this tactic from Darienne Page, receptionist for President Obama’s Oval Office …
Company size isn’t important when it comes to saving money in little ways. Here are five practical ways to watch those workplace pennies: 1. Reduce delivery fees. 2. Cut overnight shipping. 3. Look for group discounts. 4. Turn off the lights. 5. Consolidate your suppliers …

Meeting scheduling made easy

July 1, 2009 Categorized in: MeetingsOrganizingPowerPoint

With more than 200 other administrative assistants in her building, Ilja Kraag sees admins working away in their “own little boxes,” independently figuring out how to tackle tasks that an admin at the next desk may have mastered long ago. So she decided to share some of her “best practices,” especially for common tasks, such as scheduling meetings.

Everything is urgent!

July 1, 2009 Categorized in: OrganizingTime Management

Here’s some help on setting priorities when more than one person is clamoring for your attention “yesterday”:

Whittle down scheduling time

June 5, 2009 Categorized in: MeetingsOrganizing

Two online tools to help you manage schedules when everyone isn’t on the same calendar system: Meeting Agent and Shiftboard.
Chip away at a paper pile by first flipping the stack upside down, so the oldest material is on top. It’s easier to toss out old things. Break down a large pile into one-inch piles. Attack the first one-inch pile by reviewing each piece and asking these four questions:
You’ve tried sending out memos, putting up posters and issuing gentle reminders, but nothing keeps employees from leaving their extra papers behind at the copier. You feel like a den mother, constantly cleaning up after everyone. What’s the best way to get people to change their habits? Change their environment.

What’s a ‘tickler’ file?

June 5, 2009 Categorized in: FilingOrganizing

What exactly is a tickler file, and what’s the best way to use one? We liked the answer one administrative assistant, Bonnie, gave on our online forum, Admin Pro Forum.
While you may not have been partying much at the office lately, some employers see summer as an ideal time for an all-staff get-together. Instead of spending a lot on flowers and glassware rentals, though, they’re getting creative with summertime themes. Here are ideas that assistants posted on the Admin Pro Forum.
Layoffs, shortened workweeks, stressed-out workplaces … it all can lead to another byproduct of the recession: increasing workloads and work slippage. How are administrative professionals ensuring that, with stakes soaring higher than ever, no work falls through the cracks?
Boost productivity by “plotting” the items on your to-do list … Organize a boss’s overflowing e-mail box by setting up inbox folders … Manage team conflict with this tactic … Take a breather every hour, for peak productivity …
More than half of senior executives say they’re interrupted about once every 30 minutes, according to a Center for Creative Leadership survey. Here’s where assistants can play a vital role. Stave off interruptions by partnering with your boss, using these tactics.