Workplace Etiquette

Jorie Scholnik is an assistant professor of student development at Sante Fe College in Gainesville, Fla., as well as an etiquette associate at the Protocol School of Palm Beach. We connected with her recently to learn how administrative professionals can best conduct themselves on the job.
Incivility—being disrespectful, un­­­pro­­fes­­sional or just plain rude—is an epidemic in many workplaces today, Joyce E.A. Russell writes for The Wash­­ing­­ton Post. And it’s a problem for businesses, customers and employees.

The right way to deliver bad news

January 31, 2014 Categorized in: Workplace Etiquette

Severing professional ties with someone, especially an employee, can be as rough on the messenger as it is on the recipient. Take these business leaders’ advice to handle it as well as possible.
Have you ever had a co-worker you could tell was in the office before you even saw her? You know, the one who wears way too much perfume? How do you let your co-worker know it’s too much without hurting her feelings?
Handling a complaint is a high-stakes situation, whether it’s from someone you support in the office or a customer. Please a person who is upset, and you develop an ally; botch it, and you never recover in that person’s eyes.
Everyone has an abrasive colleague that he or she just doesn’t know how to deal with. Here’s one example from the Admin Pro Forum.

5 tips on business trip etiquette

November 26, 2013 Categorized in: TravelWorkplace Etiquette

The way you look and act while on a business trip reflects back on your employer. Avoid making a bad impression on your next work trip. Follow these five tips for business travel.
Smart administrative professionals choose when and how to express gentle, yet forceful, disagreement. Here are three strategies to disagree gracefully, along with situations when each tactic makes sense.
Use your anger to cultivate your creativity … Give your network a boost by diversifying … Practice the 10/5 rule in the presence of co-workers.
Sociable employees of Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. never have to eat lunch alone, thanks to a new mobile app that connects co-workers who might other­wise never meet.
Most people would be reluctant to befriend their supervisors on Face­­book, according to a recent study by three college professors. But members of Gen Y are more willing than their older counterparts to do so.

Who should pick up the tab? 6 tips

September 27, 2013 Categorized in: Workplace Etiquette

Have you ever been in the awkward position of eating out for business and wondered who should pay? Invisor Consulting Managing Partner Steve Tobak offers six guidelines.
When they happen regularly, disrespectful snubs—or “microinequities”—sap motivation and productivity, says leadership coach Brigid Moynahan of New Jersey-based The Next Level. The next time someone slings one at you, take these steps.