Managing the Boss

No matter how much effort you put into creating a travel plan for your boss, something can go wrong at the last minute. Julie Perrine, All Things Admin, has five possible solutions for sticky travel situations.

When your boss doesn’t have a clue

November 27, 2012 Categorized in: Managing the Boss

An incompetent boss is annoying at best and damaging to your career at worst. To keep your career moving forward in spite of a clueless boss, Dorothy Tannahill-Moran recommends these five actions.

What your boss needs most: Simplicity

November 13, 2012 Categorized in: Managing the Boss

Whether it’s deciding what to eat or what to wear, making decisions drains mental energy, writes Robert C. Pozen. Assistants who free their bosses from having to constantly decide on things can easily be­­come indispensable.
You’ve always compiled a monthly report for the division heads … until recently. Last week, out of nowhere, one of the execs asked another staffer to “take a crack at it.” Now, you feel left out of the loop. What can you do about it?
Just because your manager can be strict about your schedule doesn’t mean that he should, writes Suzanne Lucas. If your boss has suddenly instituted draconian rules, try to figure out the reason.

Surviving life with a bad boss

September 5, 2012 Categorized in: Managing the Boss

As nice as it would be for bosses to be superhuman, they’re just like everyone else. Some are com­petent and compassionate; others are inept and inconsiderate. Some tactics for toughing it out with a bad boss:

Boss interrupting you again?

August 9, 2012 Categorized in: Managing the Boss

On the surface, a boss or a co-worker who constantly interrupts you may come off as a bit of a jerk. However, it may simply be that in­­ter­­rupting is the only way he knows how to communicate, writes workplace communication consultant Guy Farmer.
Admins make roughly $15,000 worth of decisions every year, according to an IAAP Benchmarking survey. Yet it’s sometimes hard to know whether to make a decision on your own or wait for the boss to weigh in. Here’s one litmus test for determining whether to forge ahead or wait for a nod from the boss.
Phil, an administrative assistant, re­­cently lamented that his efforts to improve his boss’s communication were going unheeded. But perhaps it’s not what Phil’s boss wants from Phil. When someone hands you his work to look over, first determine what he wants in return.
Sarah spent the afternoon working on a quarterly report for her boss, only to hear this when she delivered it at day’s end: “This isn’t a final version, is it? It won’t be a problem for you to work overtime today and fix this, will it?” Her boss just de­­livered a question trap—a leading question.
Not all executives are content to have access to documents only on their smartphones, tablets or laptops. If you work for a boss who still depends heavily on paper and attends up to a dozen meetings a day, here’s an organizing solution for you.
Build a stronger relationship with your boss by never letting these phrases cross your lips: 1.  “It’s not my job.” 2.  “It’s not my fault.” 3.  “I can’t work with Person A.” 4.  “I can’t do X, because I have to do Y.” 5.  “That’s not possible.”
It doesn’t help anyone if you say “yes” to every project while knowing you can’t possibly complete all the work. How can you set boundaries more assertively with your boss, without coming across as incapable or rude, when you’re asked to take on yet another assignment? 7 tips: