Managing the Boss

So you think your workplace performance speaks for itself and that everything you do is amazing. Guess who might not see it that way.
Personal assistants help ensure suc­­cess­­ful executives stay on top of their work, writes Suzanne Locke for The National. Helen Clarke, personal assistant to Richard Branson (the founder of Virgin Group), knows just how much is expected in the job.
While it’s usually CEOs getting interviewed about their achievements, the people that help make those achievements possible are just as important, says April Capochino Myers for Greater Baton Rouge Business Report. Executive assistants have to stay organized and ready for any task their high-profile boss might throw at them. Here are a few executive assistants making headlines of their own.
Sometimes, it’s difficult to be en­­gaged if you and your boss don’t agree. Here are four tips that can help you see eye to eye.

New boss? Start off on the right foot

December 2, 2015 Categorized in: Managing the Boss

One of the most pivotal periods in your relationship with your boss is those first few weeks while you’re getting routines established, learning each other’s temperaments and mapping out expectations. This is especially true when it’s the boss who’s new to the company and not you. You can make yourself indispensable and ease her transition into your organization if you do the following.
Managers have a lot on their plates, which sometimes can prevent them from getting back to you about your project in a timely manner. This prevents you from moving forward and slows the process down, writes Alex Cavoulacos, a founder of The Muse. But sometimes, you can be partially to blame.
The biggest difference between the admin support pro of yesteryear and the one that excels today boils down to the ability to not just respond to the boss, but think like the boss.

Execs and admins: Working in partnership

September 23, 2015 Categorized in: Managing the Boss

Office Dynamics founder and Presi­­­­­dent Joan Burge has been coaching administrative assistants for more than 25 years. Over time, she realized she was teaching the same things over and over, which gave her the idea to develop an operational guide to help executives and their assistants work together more effectively. This year, she partnered with career coach, writer and speaker Chrissy Scivicque to write Executives and Assistants, Working in Partnership: The Definitive Guide to Success.
Ever had to keep covering for a boss who was frequently late, forgetful or just plain not available? We’ve got advice on what to do from experts and admins.
Things didn’t really happen the way your supervisor thinks, so is there a way to correct the mistaken impression without making the situation worse?
Face it: Your boss holds the keys to your next pay raise, that potential promotion and even whether you can take a vacation this summer. Do your best to foster a positive relationship with the person who has so much influence over your future.
It may seem like Patrizia Iacono is a CEO, says Sydney Morning Herald reporter Sue Green. Iacono checks emails and reviews her schedule when she’s off work, and her day starts at 5:30 a.m., when she starts reading the day’s news. But she’s an executive assistant who mentors more than two dozen other EAs across Australia.
It’s promotion time again, and again your boss passes you over and offers the promotion to a co-worker. But why? The reasons that your boss may be overlooking you for a promotion are simpler than you think.