Office Technology

Has e-mail become so ubiquitous that it has changed the way we craft business correspondence? That’s what admins recently debated on our Admin Pro Forum. Some suspected that writing “Dear” or “Very truly yours” has become too old-fashioned for digital—or even printed—correspondence. A bevy of self-proclaimed “old-school” admins protested.

Transform an e-mail list into a gold mine

March 9, 2010 Categorized in: Outlook

Are you more experienced than your boss with social-media sites? You can use those sites to help build your business’s e-mail marketing list, says Julie Waite, an e-mail marketing strategist at Bronto Software. A bigger marketing list equals more potential business, which is probably one of your boss’s top goals. Here’s what she recommends:

Click before you fly

March 9, 2010 Categorized in: InternetOrganizingTravel

Before planning air travel, check these web sites: kayak.combing.com/travelorbitz.com, flightaware.com and ifly.com.

Cracking the password code

March 9, 2010 Categorized in: Internet

Can you guess what the most common online password is? Actually, you probably could guess. Internet-security firm Imperva recently reported that 123456 is the most common password. Second-most common is 12345, followed by 123456789. And the fourth most common password is “password.”

Where does all the time go?

March 9, 2010 Categorized in: InternetTime Management

According to a 2007 survey from Salary.com, Americans waste about 20% of their time at work. And a chunk of that wasted time comes from surfing the Internet. One journalist writer, in a quest to find out where her time was going, tried out four online services that track productivity. Here’s what she learned from that experience.

3 good e-mail forwarding tips

February 5, 2010 Categorized in: Internal CommunicationOutlook

When you first see “FW:” in your e-mail inbox, you never know whether the sender is sharing something useful or frivolous. Use the “forward” button wisely, and you can connect others with valuable information or make a new, prized introduction. Keep these three tips in mind:

Are you underusing your mouse?

February 5, 2010 Categorized in: Internet

If you’re ignoring the middle button (or scroll wheel) on your mouse, you’re missing some shortcuts and only using your mouse to 70% capacity. Odds are, you get around documents and web sites just fine without using it, but, as Rick Broida points out in PC World magazine, there’s a world of potential in that little button.

Where admins are clicking

February 5, 2010 Categorized in: Internet

A few of the top web sites for administrative professionals, according to Monster.com: CEO Express, Refdesk, Microsoft Clip Art, USPS BrainyBetty and XE.com.
A few things to consider when revising your e-mails: 1. Toss useless words. 2. Last things first. 3. Watch your format. 4. Use effective subject lines. 5. Set the right tone. 6. Always allow room to be corrected.
What if your organization doesn’t have an online strategy to speak of—a skimpy web site, no social-media strategy, no e-mail list, no e-newsletter. Is it too late to catch up? And how can tech-savvy administrative professionals help push an organization toward online literacy? Best-selling author and marketing expert Seth Godin recommends venturing forward with these strategies:
An administrative assistant recently posted this dilemma on our Admin Pro Forum: “I know my office co-worker chats on Facebook most of the day … and now I have proof. Do I say something to the co-worker, or do I bring it up to the boss? I am usually not a tattletale, but there are times when I am overwhelmed with work and I know she’s chatting on Facebook and not getting her work done.” Forum readers weighed in with advice:
If you find it hard to keep up with Facebook, Twitter and other social-media tools, you’ll love this idea for a New Year’s resolution: Stop trying to keep up with social technology. Alexandra Samuel, CEO of Social Signal, says you could spend half your life trying to figure out the latest, greatest tool—so don’t even bother trying. To refocus your relationships:
To help an audience tune in to your PowerPoint presentation instead of zoning out, stick to these four cardinal rules from communications coach Carmine Gallo when creating a presentation: 1.Stick to three or four themes. 2.Type should be no smaller than 30 points. 3. Use charts sparingly. 4. Divide the number of minutes you’re allotted to speak by two—that’s how many slides you should have.