Nonverbal Communication

Using clichés will give readers the impression that they’ve heard it all before. Keep your reader engaged by making your writing as sharp and creative as your spoken conversations. Here are two simple strategies.
When you need to send a message to a group of customers, board members or an entire department, you don’t want your message to become lost in the hundred other messages they receive that day.
Is he giving you an honest answer? Is she angrier than she’s telling you? Watch for “tactile signs” to know what someone really feels.
You’re always sending messages, even as you sit in silence. “Nonverbal cues indicate what is really being said,” says communications expert Debra Hamilton. Here are the gestures and cues you should be aware of.
Remember the “Rule of 12/12/12” to make a good impression on everyone you meet.
Keeping in touch with clients—especially VIPs—requires more than the occasional Hallmark card. That’s why many businesses use custom cards as marketing tools.
It’s a common communication in the business world, but it’s often not very polished: the request letter.

Send the right message

February 1, 2007 Categorized in: Nonverbal CommunicationOutlook

Send the right message with your e-mail sign-off by “mirroring,” says Judith Kallos, creator of NetManners.com .
Even professional writers sometimes struggle with organizing their thoughts, and find themselves stuck for an opening line. When you’re in the same boat, use one of the techniques the pros use:
The reason Taco Bell’s admin team came up with its “Team of Two” training program is clear when you listen to admin Karen Walters describe managers in her building. “There were a few managers in the group who maybe weren’t using admins to their greatest capabilities,” explains Walters. “In their defense, they didn’t have a good model.” So the admin team decided to give them one…
Think of Jackie Kennedy, Oprah Winfrey, Nelson Mandela  … even top rock stars. Leaders in any circle often have qualities that make them stand out in a crowd.  You can too, by cultivating these four characteristics 31-year-old Jackie Kennedy demonstrated as first lady…