Internal Communication

Bosses aren’t the only ones who can provide feedback to employees. Giving negative feedback requires you to counsel and criticize in a way that alerts a co-worker to where the problem lies and what must be done to solve it. Follow this seven-step method:
Opening your email inbox to find a message criticizing your work is bad enough. But it’s even worse when you notice that your boss was cc’d on the message. An administrative professional re­­cently encountered this situation and wrote about it on our online forum.
To get Swedish commuters to take the stairs instead of the escalator at a metro stop, they turned the staircase into a giant keyboard, complete with sound. How can you use the same ap­­proach to change people’s behavior at work?
Networking may seem like a mysterious skill that’s beyond your grasp, but actually, it’s as simple as this Golden Rule: Always offer to help, and never expect anything in return. Three ways the rule works:
Research shows that people take longer to reply to voice messages than other types of communication. Even getting a voice message heard is a challenge. So what can you do to ensure that people respond to a message you leave them? Try these tips:

Office politics: 4 tips

April 16, 2012 Categorized in: Internal Communication

It pays to be a good politician, according to a new survey by Robert Half. Workers were asked, “In your opinion, what effect, if any, does involvement in office politics have on one’s career?” Their responses:
Sarah spent the afternoon working on a quarterly report for her boss, only to hear this when she delivered it at day’s end: “This isn’t a final version, is it? It won’t be a problem for you to work overtime today and fix this, will it?” Her boss just de­­livered a question trap—a leading question.
Build a stronger relationship with your boss by never letting these phrases cross your lips: 1.  “It’s not my job.” 2.  “It’s not my fault.” 3.  “I can’t work with Person A.” 4.  “I can’t do X, because I have to do Y.” 5.  “That’s not possible.”
Most improv performers could tell you about this crucial rule of great improv: You’ve got to listen to your scene partner. Otherwise, you may miss an important cue or the opportunity to collaborate on a creative idea. It’s the same in the workplace. Here’s an improv activity that’s worth a try:
Elevate your business writing by ridding it of these common misuses and abuses: 1. Ill-placed question marks. 2. Cool-sounding buzzwords. 3. Clichés.
The boss shares an idea, and then asks, “What do you think?” You don’t have an instant answer. How do you avoid looking stumped?

Who’s in your network at work?

February 27, 2012 Categorized in: Internal Communication

Winning at office politics could begin with this key question, “Who am I dependent on to get my job done?”

Building your online rapport

February 16, 2012 Categorized in: Internal CommunicationInternet

In the age of Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, the rules of social engagement have shifted ever so slightly. A few tips on building rapport online: