Internal Communication

Effective communication takes de­­lib­­erate intention, so if you find yours lacking, it’s time to refocus and get down to work, says Jessica Edmonson of Bisk Education. She has six strategies to help you do just that.
Disagree tactfully with someone in public, by using one of these leadoff sentences.
Few people enjoy conflict, but it’s an inevitable part of life and ­business. So if you want to succeed, you need to become skilled in managing it. A few key phrases can help you to resolve conflicts when they arise, says author, speaker and consultant Barry Moltz.

Snapshot: Communication breakdown

December 28, 2012 Categorized in: Internal Communication

U.S. workers were asked: How do you most like to communicate at work?
“What do I most need to be prepared for suddenly dealing with international cultures, people and ways of doing things? I’ve just landed a job with a big international marketing firm … I get a little nervous when they tell me about all the different clients and projects involving so many different countries.”
Bosses today value input from the receptionists and administrative assistants who come into contact with candidates during the interview process. What’s worth passing along to your boss?
Speaking in public can be a nerve-wracking experience for many people. But you can learn to manage your nerves, says Darlene Price, speaking coach and author of Well Said! Presentations and Conversations That Get Results. “Fear is what drives nervousness,” she says.
If you find yourself losing control at work, it’s important to step back and see what’s really happening—as hard as that can be to do in the moment.
It’s easy to become frustrated at work, but yelling won’t help you get your point across. Instead of screaming, use a calm tone and focus on the situation at hand, recommends Amy Levin-Epstein.
Create PDFs on the spot … Keep track of the boss’s flights … What you can learn from free LinkedIn stats … End conversations gracefully … Strengthen your secret questions.

Rid your speech of weak words

October 25, 2012 Categorized in: Internal Communication

Inject power into your remarks by eliminating words or phrases that weaken your message. That’s easier said than done, since many ­leaders aren’t aware of how their word choice works against them. Here are some keys to communicate with clarity and force:
The sage advice to avoid political discussions at work has proven tough for many people to follow this year, writes Lynze Wardle Lenio at the Daily Muse. Keep the tone civil by remembering a few ground rules:
At many organizations, it’s common practice to celebrate co-workers’ achievements with a drink after work or to band together for volunteer projects. But is it fair to penalize people who don’t want to participate in these after-hours activities?