Internal Communication

Building a happy relationship with your co-workers can result in a happier workplace. And the happier you are at work, the more creative, productive and efficient you are, says Alexander Kjerulf, author and speaker on workplace happiness.
When you’re drafting an email, memo or other written communication at the office, there are key elements to consider as you work to clearly and accurately communicate your message. Communications specialist, writer and editor Corinne LaBossiere offers four tips for successful business writing.
Take a stand for workplace wellness … Vacation is time to think about the future … If you wouldn’t poke a bear, don’t open a suspicious email.
It’s easy to dash off quick email messages and push “Send” before you’ve made sure that deadlines, action items and next steps are absolutely clear. Follow these strategies from Deborah Dumaine, author of Write to the Top.
You’re comfortable with your position, your co-workers and your workload. You’re not interested in taking on more responsibility, but you want to get more involved and maybe meet some new people within the company. The Daily Muse’s Caroline McMillan offers three easy ways to get more involved.
If you’re the office Eeyore who says, “We tried that before and it didn’t work,” highlighting the negatives isn’t likely to get you noticed—at least, not in a good way. Instead of pointing out the downside, try using these tactics.
Integrating into your workgroup is just as important as being good at your job. Part of that is getting in on conversations and knowing about office gossip. Certified life and career coach Dorothy Tannahill-Moran explains three things you need to know.
Sociable employees of Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. never have to eat lunch alone, thanks to a new mobile app that connects co-workers who might other­wise never meet.
Keep your phone calls focused and productive … Grab your in-flight meal from the hotel desk … Show the world how many people “like” you.
How much does your employer watch you? Is there a policy about Internet use at your work? How closely is your Internet usage time tracked? What’s normal?
A study by Cynthia Rudin and Been Kim at the Massachusetts Insti­­tute of Technology offers insight into the power behind words and how they can be used in the workplace to produce favorable outcomes.
Most people can delete about three-fourths of their incoming email without even reading it … and not just spam. Messages from your employer, your colleagues and your buddies are wasting your time, argues Bill Jensen, author of The Simplicity Survival Handbook: 32 Ways to Do Less and Accomplish More.
Four items (and one idea) that will have disappeared from U.S. workplaces within five years, according to a poll of 7,000 LinkedIn members.