Internal Communication

In some offices, you might kick-start relationships between older and younger workers with these tips:Try reverse-mentoring … Go out of your way to collaborate with different generations … Don’t get hung up on office eti­­quette you think everyone should be following.
Practice. That’s the best way to get comfortable with speaking in front of others. Although the idea of pub­­lic speaking may sound ter­­ri­­fy­­ing, your confidence will get a major boost from stepping out of your comfort zone and into the spot­­light.
Affirm your credibility in a meeting with these five tactics:

Making the sale

January 9, 2012 Categorized in: Internal Communication

No matter what you do in life, you have to sell something, writes author Michael Ellsberg—selling your boss on why he should promote you, selling your brilliant idea, or selling co-workers on why they should donate to your cause. How to sell, in a nutshell:
Grandmas are known for their nuggets of advice about bundling up in winter or baking a fruit cobbler. As it turns out, they know a thing or two about navigating the workplace, too. Pearls of wisdom from grandma:
“What do you do?” Be prepared for this question before you head to any networking event because you’ll probably be asked dozens of times … Need someone to make a decision? Approach him in the morning. “Decision fatigue” is a very real phenomenon affecting people who have to grapple with an ever-increasing number of choices.
The co-worker in the next cubicle hums all day. Yesterday your boss dressed you down in front of the entire team. Another admin has been griping about the same issue for a week. In every case, it would be all too easy to ignore the problem, or avoid confrontation by sending an email. But in every case, a live conversation is the better solution.

What’s your communication IQ?

December 13, 2011 Categorized in: Internal Communication

Do you know how to win people over by saying the right thing? Find out in this survey crafted by Laurie Puhn, Harvard lawyer, couples mediator and best-selling author, designed to gauge your communication IQ.
Socializing at work is good for you, according to a jillion studies. What’s not so good: getting stuck in a conversation that seems to never end, about a colleague’s trip to the pet groomer or the adorable 10 things the co-worker’s child said yesterday. Avoid these topics:
The bond between a boss and assis­­tant is far from ordinary. And feelings of devotion often run both ways. Consider these true life-saving stories of assistants and their executives:
A new study by researchers at Tel Aviv University found that em­­ployees with strong social networks on the job actually lived longer than those “working in a very unfriendly and nonsupportive environment.”
Use “and” instead of “but,” advises Joan Burge of Office Dynamics. Why? Using “but” sets up a negative that can make people defensive and less likely to listen.
Studies show how hesitant people are to challenge offensive or sexist comments. But psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson says there are at least three good reasons to confront someone making lewd or sexist comments—despite the fear of retaliation: