Internal Communication

When you think about a “happy” workplace, do you think Google? All those creative-minded people at a beautifully designed work space, working on projects while the entire world watches. You can use some of the same stra­­tegies used at Google and other offices to bring more happiness into the workplace.
You’re on your way to a meeting or you’re in the middle of a project that requires your focus, when someone tells you something im­­portant. “Got it!” you say. Later, though, you realize you weren’t fully tuned in. Consider what sort of listener you are, and then heed these tips:
Whether you’re writing for a company blog, newsletter or e-newsletter, your goal is to keep readers coming back for more. Here’s a short list of common mistakes people make when creating content:

How to ask for feedback

February 3, 2012 Categorized in: Internal Communication

You crave it. And you probably don’t get enough of it. Here’s how to ask for feedback on your performance: Schedule it. Explain what you want. Don’t fish for compliments. Ask for specifics. Stop being defensive …
Stop monopolizing a conversation. Every time someone asks you a question, ask one in return … Resist the urge to do several things at once … Avoid sending an email to the wrong person, with this tip from Patricia Robb, author of the “Laughing All the Way to Work” blog …

Do you have a presence?

January 30, 2012 Categorized in: Internal Communication

“Presence.” You know it when you see it: Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan had it. Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter did not. Those who have it gain an advantage in winning over others.
In some offices, you might kick-start relationships between older and younger workers with these tips:Try reverse-mentoring … Go out of your way to collaborate with different generations … Don’t get hung up on office eti­­quette you think everyone should be following.
Practice. That’s the best way to get comfortable with speaking in front of others. Although the idea of pub­­lic speaking may sound ter­­ri­­fy­­ing, your confidence will get a major boost from stepping out of your comfort zone and into the spot­­light.
Affirm your credibility in a meeting with these five tactics:

Making the sale

January 9, 2012 Categorized in: Internal Communication

No matter what you do in life, you have to sell something, writes author Michael Ellsberg—selling your boss on why he should promote you, selling your brilliant idea, or selling co-workers on why they should donate to your cause. How to sell, in a nutshell:
Grandmas are known for their nuggets of advice about bundling up in winter or baking a fruit cobbler. As it turns out, they know a thing or two about navigating the workplace, too. Pearls of wisdom from grandma:
“What do you do?” Be prepared for this question before you head to any networking event because you’ll probably be asked dozens of times … Need someone to make a decision? Approach him in the morning. “Decision fatigue” is a very real phenomenon affecting people who have to grapple with an ever-increasing number of choices.
The co-worker in the next cubicle hums all day. Yesterday your boss dressed you down in front of the entire team. Another admin has been griping about the same issue for a week. In every case, it would be all too easy to ignore the problem, or avoid confrontation by sending an email. But in every case, a live conversation is the better solution.