People Skills

People who interrupt when you speak don’t simply annoy; they block your ideas and opinions. Exert authority with these techniques
Disagree with the boss? Some managers say they can’t do it. Some won’t. Some wish they could. And some say it’s not necessary. But in our experience, the boss isn’t always right—and sometimes needs feedback to tell him so.
Delaying your decisions exacts a cost in both time and opportunity. Fail to confirm which venue you want for your next event, for example, and suddenly, both are booked. If you agonize over providing your “final answer,” push yourself to act, with these tips:
If you lament others treating you like “just a secretary,” examine how you break the stereotype of one who types, files and fetches coffee.
If the worst part of your job is your boss—someone who pits staff members against one another, steals credit and doesn’t support you—take this advice from the career experts at Bernard Haldane Associates…
Casual. Corporate casual. Business casual. Smart casual. Resort casual. Don’t leave meeting attendees baffled about your event’s dress code. Explain what you mean by "business casual" or "corporate casual," etc. with examples of appropriate attire.
If reaching for reference materials in your office requires moving a handful of beads you brought back from Mardi Gras, your personality may be overpowering your professional image. Personalizing our office space is tempting, but everyone should strike a balance.
If co-workers’ bad attitudes create tension, protect yourself from those office toxins.

Estimate appointment delays.

April 1, 2004 Categorized in: Managing the BossMeetings

What to do when your boss is late.
It sounds like mission impossible: ensuring that your boss has time for priority work and that he or she never arrives late for a meeting. But you wield much more control than entering appointments on a calendar and reminding the boss what’s coming on the schedule. Help the days flow smoothly by building and managing the calendar better. Here’s how…
Feel like your ideas are falling on deaf ears? Maybe it’s your sales pitch, not the proposal. Focus your “pitch” with these tactics:
Q. How should I address a woman who uses two last names, such as "Geneva Besmer Silverstone"? By her maiden name, her surname or both?
You’ve scrupulously avoided office gossip, but that isn’t protecting you from being the subject of this week’s chitchat. Wanting to jump quickly to your own defense is a normal reaction, but it might exacerbate the situation. Follow these steps to salvage your reputation and stop the gossip.