People Skills

If you’re in a supervisory position, don’t wait until it’s time for a formal performance review to dish out the positive words. Here are six guidelines for effective praising, from Bob Nelson, author of 1001 Ways to Reward Employees:

Does your boss struggle to lead?

July 19, 2011 Categorized in: Managing the Boss

Good news for the bosses of the world: Most employees (59%) say their direct supervisors are doing a good or even great job. However, 20% of the respondents to the CareerBuilder.com survey say their supervisors’ performance is poor or very poor. The biggest gripes?
When a jaw-droppingly rude email arrives in your inbox, here’s how to react: 1.  Draft the email you wish you could send. 2.  Start with, “Thank you.” 3.  Volunteer to get on the phone. 4.  Call her out.
In your relationship with your boss, who sets the tone for the relationship? Your boss? Test your assumption. You probably have more power than you think to shape the way you work together. Ask yourself these seven questions to improve your relationship:
Problem: An administrative assistant works for several Johnny-come-lately bosses who think nothing of showing up late for meetings. What can she do to thwart the rude habit? Some of our readers had solutions:
Workplace conflicts often arise because different people have different ways of doing things. Tips for navigating a clash of the styles:
“The first day of work,” says an administrative assistant on her blog, “is like the first day of school … overwhelming.” You have to make new friends, learn the new rules, get to know a new teacher. Wel­come a newbie with these tactics:
A frustrated admin recently vented on our online forum: “I’m at my wit’s end!” None of the managers was “participating” in her attempts to keep the office organized. Our advice: Start over by telling managers how a tracking system ben­efits them.
Great minds don’t always think alike, a new OfficeTeam study suggests. Work styles vary based on personality traits, communication preferences and organizational methods.

Why aren’t you getting a raise?

June 16, 2011 Categorized in: NegotiatingSalary

Adecco’s 2011 Workplace Outlook Study asked men and women whether they thought they’d receive a raise, bonus or promotion in the coming year. More than 40% of men said they thought they would receive a raise. But only 29% of women did. What accounts for the difference?
When actress Lindsay Lohan opted to wear a short, snug-­fitting white dress to her court appearance, public relations pro Meryl Weinsaft Cooper wrote on her blog, “The dress spoke volumes, though clearly not about what she had hoped it would.” What can we learn from Lohan’s wardrobe dysfunction? Plenty.
The best executive assistants are indispensable. But, initially, many have trouble developing the trust and understanding needed for a strong assistant-boss relationship. Trudy Vitti knows how difficult the initial steps of a new assistant-boss relationship can be …
Should you really have to say something twice to get someone to follow through? The most effective managers repeat themselves at least once, ­according to Harvard researchers. Some even send three or four redundant communications.