Communication

In business writing, bullet points often replace regular old paragraphs, with good reason: Readers can scan them faster. Stick to these standards for using bullets effectively:
Sarah spent the afternoon working on a quarterly report for her boss, only to hear this when she delivered it at day’s end: “This isn’t a final version, is it? It won’t be a problem for you to work overtime today and fix this, will it?” Her boss just de­­livered a question trap—a leading question.
Hold a mobile device at eye level to avoid “text neck.” Dr. Dean Fishman adopted the phrase after seeing a huge influx of younger patients visiting his chiropractor facility … Avoid writing redundant combinations that give readers a sense of “deja vu all over again” …

To whom it may concern

March 27, 2012 Categorized in: SpeakingWriting/Editing

When to use “who” and “whom,” which confuses many people:
Build a stronger relationship with your boss by never letting these phrases cross your lips: 1.  “It’s not my job.” 2.  “It’s not my fault.” 3.  “I can’t work with Person A.” 4.  “I can’t do X, because I have to do Y.” 5.  “That’s not possible.”
Is it “100” or “one hundred”? Know how to express a number in your business writing with these rules from Daily Writing Tips:
Most improv performers could tell you about this crucial rule of great improv: You’ve got to listen to your scene partner. Otherwise, you may miss an important cue or the opportunity to collaborate on a creative idea. It’s the same in the workplace. Here’s an improv activity that’s worth a try:
Elevate your business writing by ridding it of these common misuses and abuses: 1. Ill-placed question marks. 2. Cool-sounding buzzwords. 3. Clichés.
Give your résumé a 21st century update by making it search-optimized for Google … Memorize this rule when typing: one space after a period at the end of a sentence … Use this email best practice …
The boss shares an idea, and then asks, “What do you think?” You don’t have an instant answer. How do you avoid looking stumped?

Who’s in your network at work?

February 27, 2012 Categorized in: Internal Communication

Winning at office politics could begin with this key question, “Who am I dependent on to get my job done?”

Building your online rapport

February 16, 2012 Categorized in: Internal CommunicationInternet

In the age of Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, the rules of social engagement have shifted ever so slightly. A few tips on building rapport online:
When you think about a “happy” workplace, do you think Google? All those creative-minded people at a beautifully designed work space, working on projects while the entire world watches. You can use some of the same stra­­tegies used at Google and other offices to bring more happiness into the workplace.