Career

Rachel Montgomery of Ft. Meade, Md., came close to burnout, working long hours and weekends, before she found the power to make a priority of what she has to do, should do and even wants to do. Here are her tips.
To survive in your workstation, you may have unconsciously adapted to many small inconveniences. Take a few minutes to analyze your surroundings, and you’ll see how small changes could add up to a major improvement to your work space … and your mood.

Thrive through change

January 1, 2005 Categorized in: Personal DevelopmentProblem Solving

Las Vegas—If you asked Linda Eller-bee what she would be doing in five years, she would have gotten the answer wrong throughout her life, she says.
Las Vegas—Issuing snap judgments of those who annoy or irritate you adds to the stress you experience, argues Richard Carlson, author of Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff at Work (Hyperion).
Las Vegas—The most negative opinions you hear at work may be coming from—surprise!—you. Listen closely to what you tell yourself and others, and then slash the negative attitudes that hold you back.
Las Vegas—If you aren’t assertive at work, you’re stuck in a dead end, warns Mildred Saunders.
Sherry Turner, Chicago, wanted to apply for a newly created position in her organization that combined three jobs and offered more management duties than her existing admin job did.

Expert’s Corner

January 1, 2005 Categorized in: AdvancementPersonal Development

People will help you realize your dreams—whether that’s a plum assignment, a new job or a total career change—but you have to identify those potential partners.

5 ways to beat the post-lunch slump

January 1, 2005 Categorized in: Work/Life Balance

If you would rather nap in the midafternoon than do anything else, don’t rely on a jolt of caffeine or sugar to keep you going.

Grab higher-than-average raises

January 1, 2005 Categorized in: Salary

In her first year with her current employer, Lancaster, Mass., admin Jocelyn Rodgers received a 36 percent hourly pay increase. The next year, her pay rose another 20 percent.
Derail distractions for even an hour and you’ll learn a new skill, or chug through an assignment, much faster. Here’s how.
Are you one of those people who tend to put others’ needs ahead of your own? If so, that often means you’ll take on more and more work, committing to responsibilities with no time to complete them, until your life spins out of balance. Instead, try these 3 steps …
Your reputation remains your best argument for persuading the boss to alter your work schedule or sometimes allow you to work from home.