Teamwork

Inside an 'untethered' office

In a move uncommon in the United States but more popular in Europe, international real estate brokerage CBRE Group took away its em­­ployees’ personal space—offices, desks and file cabinets—and converted to an “untethered” office. Even the CEO has no home base within the office, writes Los Angeles Times reporter Roger Vincent, who took a look inside.

Adjusting to life with a new boss

A new boss can introduce a lot of new elements to your work life, such as a new leadership style, a new way of communicating and new expectations. Career coach Joyce E.A. Russell offers these tips to help you cut through your anxiety and start adjusting to your new reality.

Give them food for thought

Here's an inexpensive tactic that could elicit great suggestions from employees who might not normally volunteer to contribute.

Thorny problem? Unleash your vision

When a problem doesn't respond to solutions that have worked for you before, unlock your creativity with these approaches.

Should you let your peers' mistakes slide to teach a lesson?

Is it helpful to let a co-worker screw up a project to teach her a lesson? And if you think not, how do you deal with a colleague who insists on letting others make mistakes to show them the folly of their ways? That’s what one reader recently asked on the Admin Pro Forum.

Make team-building a fun activity

How can a leader motivate team members to move them toward mutual goals that enhance productivity? It’s all about team-building exercises. But before you choose an exercise, ask yourself two questions ...

Spur on the brainstorm of the century

You can help your organization's brainstorming sessions soar to new creative heights simply by posting these "Rules of Engagement" for the group to follow.

Keep a remote team on the same page

If your team isn’t sitting in the same office or even the same state, you may need some new management prac­­tices to keep things running smoothly. Try these tips from Travefy co-founder David Donner Chait.

Stop doing that ... and that

If your job squares with the Pareto Principle, 80 percent of the results come from 20 percent of your work. So, you're probably investing much of your time on assignments that yield little return.

Do you trust your co-workers?

U.S. workers may not trust their boss, but they do trust their colleagues, according to a survey of 475 workers by consultant Lee Hecht Harrison.