Communication

What helped clinch this year’s OfficeTeam Administrative Excellence Award for Deborah Carter? … Perk up your daily emails with MeebleMail … Double-check your work. A survey by Accountemps shows that “lack of attention to detail/sloppy work” is the No. 1 pet peeve of CFOs …

Use one word? Or two?

September 27, 2011 Categorized in: Grammar Repair ShopWriting/Editing

Is it one word or two? Take this quiz to test your knowledge of common spelling snafus:
Have you put processes or structures into place so you can accomplish what’s most important every day? Try these three tips:

A new way to IM: Office Bleepster

September 23, 2011 Categorized in: Internal Communication

The iPad app Office Bleepster is designed to make communication between an executive and assistant easy and seamless. With 25 predetermined instant-message buttons, which you set up yourself, Office Bleep­ster allows for one-button to one-button communication.
1. Include your phone number and mailing address in your signature. 2. Provide “if-then” options. 3. Always start with a greeting. 4. Check Snopes.com before you waste time forwarding a chain letter.
What should you do when no one seems to fill you in on what’s going on in the office? Admin Sandra writes about the problem on our Admin Forum: “I constantly feel like I’m left out of the loop!” she says. She’s not alone. Other administrative pros weighed in to say how they navigate the same challenge:
Set aside a few minutes each week to answer questions in the Q&A section of LinkedIn … Tack on your own comment at the top of any forwarded email messages to help the recipient understand why it’s landing in her inbox … Keep things from falling through the cracks with Boomerang for Gmail …
The truth is we could all do a better job communicating. Here are four ways to improve any conversation:
Think beyond Evite with these three digital greeting-card sites: Paperless Post, Pingg and Punchbowl.
Next time you get an email request with an urgent flag, try one of these three tips:
Chris Anderson, who runs the high-profile TED conference, believes we need to focus on limiting the flow of email, rather than focusing on how to organize and file all those messages. Anderson penned 10 ideas that could make a dent in email quantity:
The grammar police are applying full force to the rampant misuse of quotation marks. At least one web site and The Book of “Unnecessary” Quotation Marks are documenting the sometimes hilarious application of quotations in inap­propriate places. Examples of publicly posted signs:
When a jaw-droppingly rude email arrives in your inbox, here’s how to react: 1.  Draft the email you wish you could send. 2.  Start with, “Thank you.” 3.  Volunteer to get on the phone. 4.  Call her out.