Internal Communication

What’s your communication IQ?

December 13, 2011 Categorized in: Internal Communication

Do you know how to win people over by saying the right thing? Find out in this survey crafted by Laurie Puhn, Harvard lawyer, couples mediator and best-selling author, designed to gauge your communication IQ.
Socializing at work is good for you, according to a jillion studies. What’s not so good: getting stuck in a conversation that seems to never end, about a colleague’s trip to the pet groomer or the adorable 10 things the co-worker’s child said yesterday. Avoid these topics:
The bond between a boss and assis­­tant is far from ordinary. And feelings of devotion often run both ways. Consider these true life-saving stories of assistants and their executives:
A new study by researchers at Tel Aviv University found that em­­ployees with strong social networks on the job actually lived longer than those “working in a very unfriendly and nonsupportive environment.”
Use “and” instead of “but,” advises Joan Burge of Office Dynamics. Why? Using “but” sets up a negative that can make people defensive and less likely to listen.
Studies show how hesitant people are to challenge offensive or sexist comments. But psychologist Heidi Grant Halvorson says there are at least three good reasons to confront someone making lewd or sexist comments—despite the fear of retaliation:
What helped clinch this year’s OfficeTeam Administrative Excellence Award for Deborah Carter? … Perk up your daily emails with MeebleMail … Double-check your work. A survey by Accountemps shows that “lack of attention to detail/sloppy work” is the No. 1 pet peeve of CFOs …
Have you put processes or structures into place so you can accomplish what’s most important every day? Try these three tips:

A new way to IM: Office Bleepster

September 23, 2011 Categorized in: Internal Communication

The iPad app Office Bleepster is designed to make communication between an executive and assistant easy and seamless. With 25 predetermined instant-message buttons, which you set up yourself, Office Bleep­ster allows for one-button to one-button communication.
1. Include your phone number and mailing address in your signature. 2. Provide “if-then” options. 3. Always start with a greeting. 4. Check Snopes.com before you waste time forwarding a chain letter.
What should you do when no one seems to fill you in on what’s going on in the office? Admin Sandra writes about the problem on our Admin Forum: “I constantly feel like I’m left out of the loop!” she says. She’s not alone. Other administrative pros weighed in to say how they navigate the same challenge:
Set aside a few minutes each week to answer questions in the Q&A section of LinkedIn … Tack on your own comment at the top of any forwarded email messages to help the recipient understand why it’s landing in her inbox … Keep things from falling through the cracks with Boomerang for Gmail …
The truth is we could all do a better job communicating. Here are four ways to improve any conversation: