Negotiating

Negotiate like a pro

In a negotiation, neither party holds all of the cards, writes Michael Mamas for Entrepreneur. With the right approach, you can excel in your negotiations.

Negotiating for the outcome you want

When you’re trying to negotiate something at work, it can be hard to figure out the best way to successfully talk to a co-worker, writes Robert Cialdini for AG Professional. Here are some key points for talking to co-workers and negotiating the outcome you desire.

Take away fear of negotiating a raise

Most people are scared to ap­­­proach negotiation with their boss for fear of straining the relationship. However, it is important to negotiate to make sure you get paid what you deserve. The following facts can help back up your argument and take away that fear.

No raise? Try negotiating perks instead

Even if you make a great argument for why you should earn more money, your employer may be unable or unwilling to increase your pay. But there are workarounds.

Frame requests to gain what you want

When you need to ask others to change behavior that is adversely affecting your work, follow this advice.

Learn to argue productively

To prove that arguing can be positive if done in the right context, blog creator Shane Par­­rish shares some advice from Jona­­than Herring, author of How to Argue.

Is it assertiveness or aggressiveness?

It’s important to hold your ground in a tough office environment without coming across as angry or aggressive. And knowing where the line is between assertive and aggressive can make or break your career, say business ex­­perts.

How to handle intimidating negotiations

Negotiating with an influential person may feel like fighting a losing battle. If you’re about to go toe-to-toe with someone who has more status or power than you, quash your feelings of helplessness by preparing yourself mentally beforehand, suggests Brazen Career­­ist writer Savannah Marie. She offers these six tips.

Reframe questions to get what you want

When you make a request at work, the best way to get what you want is to “own the question,” says leadership writer and speaker Geoffrey James.

The power of a neutral 'No'

The fear of damaging a relationship might keep you from saying “no” to your boss or to a co-worker, but turning down someone doesn’t have to come across as combative or reluctant, notes Harvard Business Review writer Holly Weeks.