Writing/Editing

Perfect your grammar with a few apps

Everyone could use some grammar help now and then—and a host of new apps are ready to lend a hand, says New York Times tech reporter Kit Eaton.

Are those images you're using legal?

When the Office.com Clip Art library shut down in late 2014, it was a blow to those who produce office memos, newsletters and other publications. It can be tempting to just use any images you find online, but doing so is asking for trouble, legal experts say.

5 tips to make your e-newsletter speak loud and proud

Keep these in mind when launching an electronic ‘zine to grab them by the lapels and bring in their business (or just their undivided attention). They apply whether you’re blasting to 50,000 people or just that strange department on the floor beneath you.

Turn quotes into tweets

Pullquote, a Chrome app, makes it easy to share quotes on Twitter, says Lifehacker’s Patrick Allan.

Expert tips to become a Twitter master

Twitter is one of the largest, most heavily trafficked social media networks, but don’t let that scare you away from getting active on it.

How first and third work well together

Can you switch between first (I or we) and third person (he, she or they) in the same paragraph? Writing coach Lynn Gaertner-Johnston says you can, as long as you allow clarity to be your guide.

Is it 'lay' or 'lie'?

The difference between “lay” and “lie” doesn’t come from who’s doing the action (people or dogs)—it comes from the action itself, writes The Morn­­ing Call commentator Bill White.

The space between: How applicants age themselves

Do you type two spaces after a period? If so, your résumé may be destined for the wastebasket. According to career counselor Marc Miller, adding that extra space is a résumé mistake that brands an applicant as “too old.”

A high-tech tool for editing yourself

If you’re struggling to proofread your writing well, consider using text-to-speech to pinpoint errors, recommends Lifehacker’s Dave Greenbaum.

Craft the perfect LinkedIn message

Just because you’re networking on­­line doesn’t mean it’s OK to throw basic etiquette out the window. Learn to write LinkedIn messages that people will want to read with these tips.