Work/Life Balance

Rx for stress: No work email at home

Checking email and doing other work outside of normal working hours may be increasing your stress levels, according to a Gallup survey of 4,475 U.S. working adults.

A look at wellness programs

There are many reasons why em­­ployers offer workplace wellness programs, including to combat obesity and the rapidly increasing costs of medical care and health insurance, writes Napala Pratini.

Best mind-body apps

The quest for happiness can be elusive, but tech companies are seeking to provide users with mind-body solutions to make it easier. Life coach Allison Stadd shares some top mind-body applications you might want to try.

1-Minute Strategies: May '14

Improve your relationships by practicing mindfulness ... Fight stress with science ... Liberal arts degrees may not be a path to poverty after all.

Make time to pursue your passion

Many people’s day job and passion are separate pursuits, but there’s a way to manage your time and be successful at both.

Stress is top workforce health risk

Stress ranks above physical inactivity and obesity as the No. 1 workforce health issue, according to the 2013/2014 Towers Watson Staying@Work Survey. However, only 15% of employers identify improving employees’ emotional and mental health—by reducing stress and anxiety—as a top priority of their health and productivity programs.

How to be happy at work

Sharon Salzberg is an author, meditation in­­struc­­tor and founder of the Insight Medi­­­­ta­tion Soci­­ety. Recently, she answered questions about how administrative professionals can find more happiness in their work.

Try a new way to get fit

A healthy body resists illness better and contributes to a healthy mind. Dietician Anita Mirchandani recommends four fitness trends to help motivate you to work out.

1-Minute Strategies: March '14

Sweat your way to better negotiations ... Unplug to increase your productivity ... Clear out your wallet and travel light with Coin.

3 ways to cut your stress down to size

There are endless tips and tricks to mitigate the effects of stress, but what if you could shift your stress mindset altogether? A technique called “adding the opposite” can help you do just that, writes Lea McLeod, founder of The Job Success Lab.